Books In Transit #2

Books In Transit In the second edition of Books in Transit, I travelled the transit system all week overlooking people’s shoulders and scanned what Torontonians are reading this week. Sometimes its tricky, especially if you want to glance at what someone’s reading on their eReading device, but it’s oh so much fun checking out what others are reading on their morning and afternoon commutes. Hopefully some of the books below inspire you in the bookstore on your next visit!

What are Toronto Transit patrons reading this week? Well a variety of interesting books and I’m going to get Amazon’s help to describe them to you!

Cutting for Stone

Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese

A sweeping, emotionally riveting first novel — an enthralling family saga of Africa and America, doctors and patients, exile and home. Marion and Shiva Stone are twin brothers born of a secret union between a beautiful Indian nun and a brash British surgeon at a mission hospital in Addis Ababa. Orphaned by their mother’s death in childbirth and their father’s disappearance, bound together by a preternatural connection and a shared fascination with medicine, the twins come of age as Ethiopia hovers on the brink of revolution. Yet it will be love, not politics — their passion for the same woman — that will tear them apart and force Marion, fresh out of medical school, to flee his homeland. He makes his way to America, finding refuge in his work as an intern at an underfunded, overcrowded New York City hospital. When the past catches up to him — nearly destroying him — Marion must entrust his life to the two men he thought he trusted least in the world: the surgeon father who abandoned him and the brother who betrayed him.

An unforgettable journey into one man’s remarkable life, and an epic story about the power, intimacy, and curious beauty of the work of healing others.

Life by Keith RichardsLife - Keith Richards

The long-awaited autobiography of the guitarist, songwriter, singer, and founding member of the Rolling Stones. Ladies and gentlemen: Keith Richards.

With The Rolling Stones, Keith Richards created the songs that roused the world, and he lived the original rock and roll life.

Now, at last, the man himself tells his story of life in the crossfire hurricane. Listening obsessively to Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records, learning guitar and forming a band with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones. The Rolling Stones’s first fame and the notorious drug busts that led to his enduring image as an outlaw folk hero. Creating immortal riffs like the ones in “Jumping Jack Flash” and “Honky Tonk Women.” His relationship with Anita Pallenberg and the death of Brian Jones. Tax exile in France, wildfire tours of the U.S., isolation and addiction. Falling in love with Patti Hansen. Estrangement from Jagger and subsequent reconciliation. Marriage, family, solo albums and Xpensive Winos, and the road that goes on forever.

With his trademark disarming honesty, Keith Richard brings us the story of a life we have all longed to know more of, unfettered, fearless, and true.

Homicide - David SimonHomicide: A Year on the Killing Streets by David Simon

From the creator of HBO’s The Wire, the classic book about homicide investigation that became the basis for the hit television show

The scene is Baltimore. Twice every three days another citizen is shot, stabbed, or bludgeoned to death. At the center of this hurricane of crime is the city’s homicide unit, a small brotherhood of hard men who fight for whatever justice is possible in a deadly world.

David Simon was the first reporter ever to gain unlimited access to a homicide unit, and this electrifying book tells the true story of a year on the violent streets of an American city. The narrative follows Donald Worden, a veteran investigator; Harry Edgerton, a black detective in a mostly white unit; and Tom Pellegrini, an earnest rookie who takes on the year’s most difficult case, the brutal rape and murder of an eleven-year-old girl.

Originally published fifteen years ago, Homicide became the basis for the acclaimed television show of the same name. This new edition–which includes a new introduction, an afterword, and photographs–revives this classic, riveting tale about the men who work on the dark side of the American experience.

Happier At Home by Gretchen RubinHappier At Home - Gretchen Rubin

Tolstoy wrote, “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” This is the statement that inspired bestselling author Gretchen Rubin to wonder whether she could foster an even greater happiness in her home. During The Happiness Project, the same questions kept tugging at her. How can I raise happy children? How can I maintain a tender, romantic relationship with my spouse–after fifteen years of marriage? How do I keep my Blackberry from taking over my private life? How can I foster a well-ordered, light-hearted atmosphere in my house, when no one else will lift a finger to cooperate?

This book is Gretchen’s account of her second journey in pursuit of happiness. Prescriptive, easy-to-follow, and anecdotal, Happier at Home offers readers a way of thinking and being that is positive and life-affirming. With specific examples following the calendar year, an intimate voice, and drawing from science and pop culture, this book will resonate with anyone looking to strengthen the bonds of family.

Destinys PathDestiny’s Path by Anna Jacobs

Three Blake sisters remain in the Swan River Colony in 1866 and two are quite happy to forge new lives for themselves there.

The third, Xanthe, yearns to see the world. But even if she could afford to travel, could she persuade her beloved twin to let her go? Maia has fallen in love with their employer, and would surely be happiest staying behind with him.

Xanthe’s opportunity comes in the form of a handsome Irishman bringing some of the sisters’ inheritance from England. But for Maia, the same man brings trouble in his wake – someone who has the power to make her life a misery.

Both sisters’ reserves of courage and endurance will be tested before they can finally find a home to call their own.

A special thanks to @kortakova for snapping this picture of someone enjoying Christopher Hitchen’s final masterpiece Mortality.

photo-7

This week there were people reading about rock stars, hospital revelations and better living suggestions. Get inspired by the people of Toronto and stay tuned next week for round three of Books in Transit!

For a more in depth version of what the people of Toronto are reading, check out Seen Reading’s website OR pick up Julie Wilson’s book Seen Reading at your local bookstore. If you’re a US resident, check out Underground New York Public Library’s blog!

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3 thoughts on “Books In Transit #2

  1. AnnH says:

    This is fascinating. I don’t get to ride public transportation very much but I am always curious and surprised by what people are reading! Love Books in Transit!

  2. Perogyo says:

    I love this! Here in Japan despite the fact that we spend more time on public transit, it is hard to do this. Everyone has covers for their books so I can’t peek!

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